Required Documents - Mexico & United States

Information current as of January 20, 2008

Pilot in command -

1. Pilot Certificate (Private, Commercial or A.T.P., no students permitted)

2. Pilot's Current Medical Certificate

3. 4th Class Restricted Radiotelephone Operators Permit (4th Class)

4. Proof of Citizenship - a Valid Passport. They can not refuse a US citizen entry into the United States, but they can make it difficult for you to prove your citizenship without a passport.

5. United States citizens are required by Mexico to obtain a tourist visa, form FM1. This can be purchased at any International Mexican Airport of Entry. The cost is $20US.

If the pilot in command does not own the aircraft entering Mexico, a notarized letter of permission to fly the aircraft in Mexican airspace must be obtained from the registered owner or owners. This letter is written in Spanish and English.

Passengers -

1. Proof of Citizenship - a Valid Passport. They can not refuse a US citizen entry into the United States, but they can make it difficult for you to prove your citizenship without a passport.

2. United States citizens are required by Mexico to obtain a tourist visa, form FM1. This can be purchased at any International Mexican Airport of Entry. The cost is $20US.

3. Children, under the age of 18 and traveling without either parent, must have a notarized letter of consent, signed by both parents, giving permission to the pilot in command to enter Mexico with their child or children. The letter must include the name of the pilot and the dates the child or children will be in Mexico. This letter is written in Spanish and English.

4. A parent transporting their own minor child or children must have a notarized and dated letter of permission from the other parent. This letter is written in Spanish and English.

Note: These letters of permission are also required to exit Mexico.

Aircraft

1. The aircraft Certificate of Registration (permanent copy) - A United States Customs Service rule mandates that private aircraft arriving in the united States carry the permanent registration. Customs will not accept the pink copy from a temporary registration application or duplicate copies of the original permanent registration.

Note: Now that airplane registration is renewed every 3 years you should check the expiry date of the registration card in the airplane at least 6 weeks before the proposed trip so that it can be renewed if needed.

2. Aircraft Airworthiness Certificate.

3. Aircraft operating limitations and the weight & balance information.

4. The Federal Communication Commission aircraft radio station license.

5. An exterior plaque attached to the fuselage, aft of the pilot's entry, bearing the aircraft make, model and serial number.

6. An operating two way VHF radio.

7. An operating 4096 code transponder with mode C capability.

8. Aircraft registration identification (N numbers) is required to be twelve inches. Four inch letters and numbers are not legal in Mexico. They will allow you to put on temporary vinyl type letters and numbers if your aircraft has four inch letters and numbers.

9. Proof of insurance which verifies that the current insurance is in force and provides liability coverage in Mexico. United States insurance policies must explicitly state Valid liability coverage in Mexico. To qualify for a multiple entry authorization, the policy must be an annual policy and must not expire in less than ninety days.

10. In cases of partnerships and rented or borrowed aircraft, a notarized letter, from all the registered owners, granting the pilot in command, permission to fly the aircraft in Mexico is required. This letter should state when you will be operating the aircraft in Mexico. It is recommended that additional days be included beyond your expected stay in Mexico. If you make frequent trips into Mexico, a letter granting permission for an extended period of time is permissible. If the aircraft is registered to a corporation, it is best to state that you are on a pleasure trip and not on business.

Note: When you are given documents by Mexican officials, i.e. an aircraft general declaration or multiple entry authorization and personal visas, verify that the dates, names and numbers are correct. Sometimes they will make a mistake and you want to be the person to catch it, not another Mexican official in the interior of Mexico.